Barack Obama photo

Statement of Administration Policy: H.R. 273 - Eliminating the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees

February 13, 2013


STATEMENT OF ADMINISTRATION POLICY

(House Rules)

(Rep. DeSantis, R-FL, and 45 cosponsors)

The Administration opposes H.R. 273, which would extend the current Federal civilian pay freeze through December 31, 2013. This extension would mean that Federal civilian employees? across-the-board pay freeze would last for a third consecutive year. In 2010, as one of several steps the Administration took to put the Nation on a sustainable fiscal path, the President proposed and the Congress enacted an unprecedented two-year freeze on across-the-board pay adjustments for civilian Federal employees. This freeze already is expected to save more than $60 billion over 10 years. Federal civilian employees are central to the Federal Government?s success in serving the American people. They assure the safety of this country?s food and airways, defend the homeland, provide health care to the Nation?s veterans, search for cures to devastating diseases, and provide vital support to our troops at home and abroad.

The President?s Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 Budget proposed a pay increase equal to one-half of one percent of the current pay for most Federal civilian employees beginning on January 1, 2013. However, the FY 2013 Continuing Appropriations Resolution (Public Law 112-75) extended the pay freeze through March 27, 2013. The President issued Executive Order 13635 to ensure that when this pay freeze expires, Federal employees would receive the increase proposed by the President without triggering the higher increase that would otherwise take place under statute. This modest pay increase will help ensure that the Government remains competitive in attracting and retaining the Nation?s best and brightest individuals for public service.

Barack Obama, Statement of Administration Policy: H.R. 273 - Eliminating the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/303757