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Memorandum From the President on Trade Sanctions Against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia

November 14, 1979

Presidential Determination No. 80-6

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

Subject: Maintenance of Sanctions Against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia Under Section 408(b) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1980 and 1981

Pursuant to Section 408(b) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1980 and 1981 (93 Stat. 405), I hereby determine that it is in the national interest of the United States to continue sanctions against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia at this time.

You are requested, on my behalf, to report this determination promptly to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.

You are further requested to report to me immediately upon the conclusion of the present Constitutional Conference on Zimbabwe-Rhodesia being held in London, describing the conclusions of that conference and your recommendations for action by the United States with respect to the termination of sanctions.

This determination shall be published in the FEDERAL REGISTER.

JIMMY CARTER

JUSTIFICATION FOR PRESIDENTIAL DETERMINATION UNDER SECTION 408(b) OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEARS 1980 AND 1981 CONCERNING SANCTIONS AGAINST ZIMBABWE-RHODESIA

PROBLEM

Section 408(b) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1980 and 1981, requires that sanctions against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia be terminated by November 15, 1979, unless the President determines that it would not be in the national interest of the United States and so reports to the Congress.

JUSTIFICATION

Encouraging progress has been made in recent months toward a peaceful resolution of the conflict in Zimbabwe-Rhodesia; however, the negotiations presently being conducted by the United Kingdom with the parties have not yet been concluded, and differences still remain. A termination of sanctions at this stage could lead all the parties to harden their positions and would jeopardize the chances for a successful settlement for Zimbabwe-Rhodesia.

The British Government has not yet concluded negotiations that would end the rebellion in Rhodesia. They have stated that this will occur when the British Governor arrives in Salisbury and assumes authority. At the present time, the great bulk of British sanctions remain in force and none of our major allies has taken action to terminate sanctions.

The negotiations are now at a critical stage. We hope they will be rapidly and successfully concluded. While the talks continue, it would be premature for the United States to alter its position on sanctions. We would, however, be prepared to lift sanctions when a British Governor assumes authority in Salisbury and a process leading to impartial elections has begun. Our policy will continue to be that no party should have a veto over fair settlement proposals.

This issue will be kept under continuous review and the President will promptly notify the Congress when conditions warrant the lifting of sanctions.

Jimmy Carter, Memorandum From the President on Trade Sanctions Against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/248925

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