George Bush photo

Memorandum on Determination on the Eligibility of the Republic of the Marshall Islands To Be Furnished Defense Articles and Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act and the Arms Export Control Act

January 06, 1993

Presidential Determination No. 93-9

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by Section 503(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 2311(a), and Section 3(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, 22 U.S.C. 2753(a)(1), I hereby find that the furnishing, sale, and/or lease of defense articles and services to the Government of Republic of the Marshall Islands will strengthen the security of the United States and promote world peace.

You are directed to report this finding to Congress and to publish it in the Federal Register.


GEORGE BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, January 6, 1993.


Justification for Presidential Determination of Eligibility of the Republic of the Marshall Islands To Be Furnished Defense Articles and Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act

Section 503 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and Section 3(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (the Act) require, as a condition of eligibility to acquire defense articles and services from the United States, that the President find that the furnishings of such articles to and services to the country concerned will strengthen the security of the United States and promote world peace.

The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) occupies a strategic geographic position in the South Pacific. It is a democracy, and has been linked closely to the United States since the end of World War II. From 1945 to 1986, the RMI was a U.N. Trust Territory administered by the United States. Since 1986, the RMI and the United States have been bound by a Compact of Free Association (the Compact) by which the United States assumes responsibility for defense of the RMI.

Little provision was made in the Compact for the transfer of military equipment and services to the RMI because it was felt that the RMI would not require assistance of this kind. However, as the RMI attains political and economic maturity, it is developing an increasing need for military assistance.

Maritime surveillance and the oversight of its fishing areas will consume an increasing percentage of the RMI's budget. This quasi-military activity must be borne largely by the RMI alone, given practical limitations on the U.S. military's ability to divert assets to support such operations. With U.S. concurrence, the RMI already has established a modest maritime surveillance capability using equipment. and training donated by the government of Australia. The RMI's interest in acquiring additional military equipment (vessels, weaponry, ammunition, communications gear, etc.) as well as expert training in maritime surveillance skills will grow over time. Absent ability on the part of the United States to supply appropriate equipment and services, the RMI will turn elsewhere-a development which would complicate our defense arrangements with RMI.

Providing defense articles and services to the RMI will further our long-term goals of promoting stability in the South Pacific, will strengthen our ties to the RMI, and thereby will strengthen the security of the United States and promote world peace.

George Bush, Memorandum on Determination on the Eligibility of the Republic of the Marshall Islands To Be Furnished Defense Articles and Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act and the Arms Export Control Act Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/327752

Filed Under

Categories

Attributes

Simple Search of Our Archives