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Campaign Press Release - Biden Would Kill Fracking In Pennsylvania?

October 13, 2020

Biden repeatedly said he would "end" fracking, a decision that would kill Keystone State jobs and devastate its economy

Key Takeaways:

  • During his rally in Johnstown, President Trump highlighted the importance of fracking to Pennsylvania's economy and workers while emphasizing Biden's plan to end fracking
  • While President Trump has helped make America an energy super-power, Biden's radical energy policies would kill Pennsylvania jobs and leave the U.S. at the mercy of foreign energy producers
  • Biden's "energy" plan openly calls for eliminating oil and gas from the U.S. energy grid by 2035
  • Biden repeatedly expressed support for wiping out fracking, oil and gas production, and the jobs they support
  • Biden admitted during a debate last year there would be "no place" for fossil fuels, including fracking, in a Biden presidency, and that fossil fuels would be "eliminated"
  • Biden agreed with a supporter in January that fracking needed to be stopped
  • Biden said in February that he wants to "phase out" oil and gas
  • In March, Biden exclaimed "so am I!" after Bernie Sanders said he was campaigning on "stopping fracking as soon as we possibly can"
  • Last year, Biden pledged to a supporter that he would "end" fossil fuels
  • Biden said he would "sacrifice" "hundreds of thousands" of oil and gas jobs in pursuit of his anti-energy agenda
  • Kamala Harris wants to eliminate all fracking, saying "there's no question I'm in favor of banning fracking"
  • Biden's plan to destroy the fracking industry would devastate Pennsylvania
  • A fracking ban would kill 609,000 Pennsylvania jobs and take $261 billion out of the state's economy
  • A fracking ban would cut state and local revenues by more than $23 billion, money that would have to be made up elsewhere with higher taxes

BIDEN HAS REPEATEDLY SAID HE WOULD END FRACKING

Biden Has Repeatedly Promised Leftist Activists That He Will End Fracking

In March, Biden Said He Would Not Allow Any New Fracking. SEN. BERNIE SANDERS (I-VT): "Joe believes, to continue fracking. Correct me if I am wrong. What we need to do right now is bring the world together, tell the fossil fuel industry that we are going to move aggressively to win solar, sustainable energies..." CNN'S JAKE TAPPER: "Thank you." SANDERS: "... and energy efficiency." TAPPER: "Thank you, Senator." JOE BIDEN: "No more -- no new fracking." (Joe Biden, Remarks During Democratic Debate," Washington, DC, 3/15/20)

  • Biden Exclaimed "So Am I" After Bernie Sanders Said He Was Campaigning On "Stopping Fracking As Soon As We Possibly Can." SENATOR BERNIE SANDERS (I-VT): "I'm talking about stopping fracking as soon as we possibly can. I'm talking about telling the fossil fuel industry that they are going to stop destroying this planet -- no ifs, buts and maybes about it. I'm talking about speaking to..." JOE BIDEN: "So am I." (Joe Biden, Remarks During Democratic Debate," Washington, DC, 3/15/20)


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In January, Biden Agreed With A Supporter That Fracking Needed To Be Stopped. VOTER: "Well, like what about, say, stopping fracking and stopping..." JOE BIDEN: "Yes." VOTER: "...new pipeline infrastructure." BIDEN: "Yes, new pipeline, exactly." (Joe Biden, Remarks At Campaign Event, Claremont, NH, 1/24/20)


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In July 2019, Biden Said That There Would Be No Place For Fracking In A Biden Administration, Saying "We Would Work It Out. We Would Make Sure It's Eliminated." CNN'S DANA BASH: "Just to clarify, would there be any place for fossil fuels, including coal and fracking, in a Biden administration?" JOE BIDEN: "No, we would -- we would work it out. We would make sure it's eliminated and no more subsidies for either one of those, either -- any fossil fuel." Joe Biden, Remarks At A Democratic Presidential Primary Debate, Detroit, MI, 7/31/19)


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There Is "No Question" That Biden's Running Mate, Kamala Harris, Wants To Ban Fracking

In September 2019, Kamala Harris Said: "There's No Question I Am In Favor Of Banning Fracking." QUESTION: "From contaminated groundwater to poisonous emissions -- will you commit to implementing a federal ban on fracking your first day in office, adding the United States to the list of countries who have banned this devastating practice?" SENATOR KAMALA HARRIS (D-CA): There's no question I'm in favor of banning fracking, so yes. And starting -- and starting with what we can do on day one around public lands, right? And then there has to be legislation, but yes -- and this is something I've taken on in California. I have a history of working on this issue. And to your point, we have to just acknowledge that the residual impact of fracking is enormous in terms of the impact on the health and safety of communities -- yeah, so thank you." (Sen. Kamala Harris, Remarks At A CNN Climate Change Town Hall, New York City, NY, 9/4/19)


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Biden Openly Admits He Would "Phase Out Fossil Fuels" – A Decision That Would End Fracking

In February 2020, Biden Said He Wants To Phase Out Fossil Fuels. JOE BIDEN: "They want to do the same thing I want to do. They want to phase out fossil fuels and we're going to phase out fossil fuels." (Senator Joe Biden, Remarks At Campaign Event, Somersworth, NH, 2/5/20)


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In December 2019, Biden Said He Would "Love To" Ban Fracking And Would "Love To Make Sure We Can't Use Any Oil Or Gas, Period." VOTER: "I've looked at your climate plan. Why doesn't it ban fracking? JOE BIDEN: "Why doesn't it ban fracking? Because you can't ban fracking right now. You've got to transition away from it. Look, you're going to ban fracking all across America right now, right?" VOTER: "I would love to." BIDEN: "Yeah. I'd love to too. I'd love to make sure we cant' use any oil or gas, period. Now. Now. Is it possible? VOTER: "Yes" BIDEN: "Well, you ought to vote for somebody else." (Sunrise Movement, YouTube, 12/6/19)


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In September 2019, Biden Promised An Activist That He Would "End Fossil Fuel." JOE BIDEN: "But kiddo, I want you to just take a look, ok. You don't have to agree, but I want you to look in my eyes, I guarantee you, I guarantee you we are going to end fossil fuel and I am not going to cooperate with them, ok." (Joe Biden, Remarks At A Campaign Event, New Castle, NH, 9/6/19)


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Biden Would "Sacrifice" Blue Collar Energy Jobs To Please The Radical Left

In December, Biden Said He Is Willing To "Sacrifice" Hundreds Of Thousands Of Fossil Fuel Jobs. TIM ALBERTA: "Vice President Biden, I'd like to ask you. Three consecutive American presidents have enjoyed stints of explosive economic growth due to a boom in oil and natural gas production. As president, would you be willing to sacrifice some of that growth, even knowing potentially that it could displace thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands of blue-collar workers in the interest of transitioning to that greener economy?" JOE BIDEN: "The answer is yes." (Joe Biden, Remarks During Democratic Debate, Los Angeles, CA, 12/19/19)


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Biden's Plan Openly Calls For Eliminating The Oil And Gas Industries

Biden's "Energy" Plan Calls For A "Carbon Pollution-Free Power Sector By 2035." "Power Sector: Move ambitiously to generate clean, American-made electricity to achieve a carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035." ("The Biden Plan To Build A Modern, Sustainable Infrastructure And An Equitable Clean Energy Future," Biden For President, Accessed 10/13/20)

  • By Definition, This Would Lead To Natural Gas, Coal, And Oil Being Eliminated From The U.S. Energy Grid. "Presidential candidate Joe Biden's $2 trillion climate plan is supposed to eliminate carbon dioxide emissions from the electric sector by 2035. In 2019, 62 percent of U.S. electricity generation was produced from natural gas, coal, and petroleum products—the energy sources that will need to be replaced if Biden's plan goes into effect." ("Biden's Costly, Quixotic 'Clean Energy' Standard," Institute For Energy Research, 8/10/20)

The Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force Also Called For "Eliminating Carbon Pollution From Power Plants By 2035." "To reach net-zero emissions as rapidly as possible, Democrats commit to eliminating carbon pollution from power plants by 2035 through technology-neutral standards for clean energy and energy efficiency." ("Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force Recommendations," Biden For President, Accessed 10/13/20)

ENDING FRACKING WOULD KILL PENNSYLVANIA JOBS

A Fracking Ban Would Cost Pennsylvania 609,000 Jobs And Shrink The State's Economy By $261 Billion

Banning Fracking Would Cost Pennsylvania 609,000 Jobs And Shrink The State's Economy By $261 Billion By 2025. ("What If...Hydraulic Fracturing Was Banned?," Global Energy Institute, 12/18/19)

Pennsylvania Household Incomes Would Decline by $114 Billion And Cost-of-Living Would Increase By $4,654 Per Person Under A Fracking Ban. ("What If...Hydraulic Fracturing Was Banned?," Global Energy Institute, 12/18/19)

Pennsylvania's State And Local Tax Revenue Would Decline By $23.4 Billion Under A Fracking Ban. ("What If...Hydraulic Fracturing Was Banned?," Global Energy Institute, 12/18/19)

FRACKING HAS MADE PENNSYLVANIA AN ENERGY POWER HOUSE – GAINS THAT WOULD BE WIPED OUT UNDER BIDEN

Fracking Has Created Hundreds Of Thousands Of Pennsylvania Jobs

According to the Marcellus Shale Coalition And The Pennsylvania Department Of Labor And Industry, There Are More Than 220,000 Pennsylvania Jobs Supported By Natural Gas. "There are hundreds of companies — big and small — throughout the region that are looking for workers with a wide variety of skills and training. In fact, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, more than 220,000 jobs in Pennsylvania are supported by responsible natural gas development." ("Employment Resources," Marcellus Shale Coalition, Accessed 7/8/20)

A 2012 IHS Study Found That Fracking Supported 102,668 Jobs In The State's Economy That Year, And Projected The Industry Would Add More Than 387,360 Jobs To The State By 2035. ("America's New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy Volume 2: State Economic Contributions," IHS, 12/12)

  • IHS Found That Jobs In The Pennsylvania Shale Industry Pay 60 Percent Better Than The Average Annual Wage In The State. "As for labor income, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania in 2012 is $58, 400, while the average wage of direct jobs in unconventional gas activity is much higher, at $97,000." ("America's New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy Volume 2: State Economic Contributions," IHS, 12/12)
  • IHS Found That The Shale Industry Added More Than $14 Billion To The State's Economy In 2012, And Projected The Industry To Add Over $49 Billion By 2035. ("America's New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy Volume 2: State Economic Contributions," IHS, 12/12)

Due To The Shale Boom, Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Production Has Spiked

Pennsylvania Currently Ranks Second In The Nation In Natural Gas Production. ("Rankings: Natural Gas Marketed Production, 2017," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)

From 2008 - 2018, Natural Gas Production In Pennsylvania Rose 2,800 Percent, Boosting The State's Share Of U.S. Natural Gas Production From One Percent To Sixteen Percent. "Before Marcellus production ramped up, Pennsylvania produced just one percent of the nation's supply of natural gas, but today the state accounts for 16 percent. Production jumped 2,800 percent in the ten-year period covered by the report." ("Pennsylvania," U.S. Energy Information Agency, Accessed 7/8/18)

  • Pennsylvania Increased Its Natural Gas Production 10-Fold From 2010 To 2017 Because Of Fracking In The Marcellus Shale. "Pennsylvania's natural gas production was almost 10 times larger in 2017 than in 2010." ("Pennsylvania, State Profile And Energy Estimates," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)
  • Since 2008, Natural Gas Production In Pennsylvania Has Increased "35-Fold." "This week, Pennsylvania is in the spotlight, as energy industry leaders participate in the Shale Insight conference in downtown Pittsburgh. Little more than a decade ago, the thought of Pennsylvania as an energy powerhouse would have been met with derision. In 2008, the state was producing less than 200 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of natural gas annually—barely 1% of the national total. Since then, output has skyrocketed 35-fold to an annual rate of approximately 7,000 Bcf, and the state is producing about one-fifth of all U.S. natural gas—second only to Texas." (Dan Byers, "Shale Revolution Transforming Pennsylvania into an Energy and Industrial Powerhouse," Global Energy Institute, 10/23/2019)

The Fracking Boom In Pennsylvania Has Made The State An Energy Powerhouse

The Marcellus Shale, Which Holds The Nation's Largest Proven Natural Gas Reserves, Lies Under Three-Fifths Of Pennsylvania. "The Marcellus formation extends under three-fifths of Pennsylvania and parts of West Virginia, New York, Ohio, and Maryland.41 It has the largest estimated proved reserves of any U.S. natural gas field. During 2016 alone, Pennsylvania added 6.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas proved reserves, the largest net increase of all the states that year as a result of development of the Marcellus shale." ("Pennsylvania, State Profile And Energy Estimates," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)

  • "The Marcellus Shale, The Largest U.S. Natural Gas Field, Underlies About 60% Of The State In An Arc Reaching From The Southwest To The Northeast." ("Pennsylvania, State Profile And Energy Estimates," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)

Pennsylvania Holds Over 20 Percent Of The Nation's Natural Gas Reserves. ("Pennsylvania - Reserves," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)

  • A 2011 Federal Reserve Found That The Estimated Value Of Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Reserves In Pennsylvania Is $1.46 Trillion. "Current estimates indicate that about 489 trillion cubic feet of gas can be recovered from the Marcellus shale formation in Pennsylvania, for a total gross value of $1.46 trillion." (Timothy W. Kelsey, Ph.D. and Thomas B. Murphy, "Economic Implications Of Natural Gas Drilling In The Marcellus Shale Region," The Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia's Cascade, Summer 2011)

Previously A Natural Gas Importer, Under The Shale Boom, Pennsylvania Is Now Exporting Natural Gas To Other States. "In the past, natural gas production in Pennsylvania outpaced the ability of regional infrastructure to process and transport it out of the region. Several pipeline projects in recent years have alleviated these constraints. These projects include the Rockies Express Zone 3 expansion, which entered into service in October 2016 and moves natural gas westward from southwest Pennsylvania, and the Algonquin Incremental Market pipeline, which began operating in December 2016 and primarily moves natural gas from northeastern Pennsylvania into New England. Most of the natural gas shipped by pipeline from Pennsylvania goes to New Jersey, New York, Maryland, and West Virginia." ("Pennsylvania, State Profile And Energy Estimates," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)

The Fracking Boom Has Benefitted Pennsylvania Households – Reducing Energy Bills And Delivering Hundreds Of Dollars In Benefits

Half Of Pennsylvania Households Use Natural Gas As The Primary Heat Source For Their Homes. "About 51% of Pennsylvania households use natural gas as their primary home heating fuel, 22% rely on electricity, 17% use fuel oil, 4% use propane, and nearly 3% burn wood."("Pennsylvania, State Profile And Energy Estimates," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)

The Shale Boom Reduced The Price Of Natural Gas For Pennsylvanians By An Average Of 40 Percent Over The Last Decade According To The U.S. Energy Information Administration. "Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale gas boom has significantly cut energy costs for consumers across the state, according to a new study released Friday by the University of Pennsylvania. Residential gas customers have seen a price drop of 40 percent on average, compared to costs ten years ago." ("Pennsylvania," U.S. Energy Information Agency, Accessed 7/8/20)

  • The Average Price Of Natural Gas For Households In Pennsylvania Fell From $16.22 To $11.25 From 2008 To 2017, A 36 Percent Decline. ("Pennsylvania Price Of Natural Gas Delivered To Residential Consumers," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Accessed 7/8/20)

According To Research From The Brookings Institution, The Fracking Boom And Increased U.S. Natural Gas Production Has Provided $220 In Benefits To The Average Pennsylvania Consumer. (Catherine Hausman and Ryan Kellogg, "Welfare And Distributional Implications Of Shale Gas," The Brookings Institute, 3/19/15)

  • A 2015 Boston Consulting Group Study Estimated That The Average American Household Saved $776 In 2014 As A Result Of The Fracking Boom From Cheaper Natural Gas, Electricity, And Consumer Goods. (Michael E. Porter, David S. Gee, and Gregory J. Pope, "America's Unconventional Energy Opportunity," Boston Consulting Group, 6/10/15)
  • A 2015 Boston Consulting Group Study Estimated That The Average American Household Saved $120 In 2014 As A Result Of Cheaper Natural Gas From Fracking. (Michael E. Porter, David S. Gee, and Gregory J. Pope, "America's Unconventional Energy Opportunity," Boston Consulting Group, 6/10/15)

A 2014 Study From Boston Consulting Group Found That The Average American Household Is Saving Between $425 And $725 A Year Because Of The Shale Boom. "We estimate that today, the average U.S. household is already saving anywhere from $425 to $725 a year because of lower energy costs that can be attributed to domestically recovered shale gas. This cheaper energy is helping hold down prices for utilities, transportation, and finished goods. By 2020, we project, the average annual savings per U.S. household could rise to as much as $1,200." (Harold L. Sirkin, Michael Zinser, and Justin Rose, "How Cheap Natural Gas Benefits The Budgets Of U.S. Households," Boston Consulting Group, 2/3/14)

Pennsylvania Has Reaped The Benefits Of New Jobs, Higher Incomes, Higher Land Values, And More Tax Revenues From Fracking

A Bureau Of Labor Statistics (BLS) Analysis Showed That While The Rest Of The State's Economy Was Struggling From 2007 To 2012, The Shale Boom Provided New, Higher Paying Jobs For Pennsylvania. "Despite recent declines in Pennsylvania's overall economy, the state's oil and natural gas industry has seen substantial growth in terms of both employment and wages. (See figure 3.) From 2007 to 2012, total annual average employment in Pennsylvania declined by 74,133 (–1.3 percent), to 5,578,414; by contrast, employment in the oil and natural gas industry increased by 15,114 (259.3 percent) over the same period. In addition, while the state's average annual pay increased by $5,158 (11.9 percent), to $48,397 in 2012, wages in Pennsylvania's oil and natural gas industry rose by $22,104 (36.3 percent), to $82,974 in 2012." (Jennifier Cruz, Peter W. Smith, and Sara Stanley, "The Marcellus Shale Gas Boom In Pennsylvania: Employment And Wage Trends," Bureau Of Labor Statistics U.S. Department Of Labor, 2/14)

  • A 2014 Report Concluded That Fracking Of The Marcellus Shale Led To Significant Job Creation In The Construction Industry Despite The Downturn In The Economy. "A preliminary examination of employment data in states related to the Marcellus Shale Play (i.e., Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia) reveals that natural gas exploration has been a strong engine of job growth. From 2008 to the first half of 2014, over 72 million hours of direct and indirect construction labor has been worked on natural gas and oil projects related to the Marcellus Shale. These hours translate to 36,321 actual construction workers (based on a standard 2,000 hours of work) and engaged in oil and gas work that would not have occurred "but for" natural gas exploration in the Marcellus Shale geological footprint." (Dr. Robert Bruno and Michael Cornfield, "Study Of Construction Employment In Marcellus Shale Related Oil And Gas Industry," University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign School Of Labor And Employment Relations, 8/29/14)

A 2013 Study By The Manhattan Institute Found That Where Fracking Occurred In Pennsylvania, Those Counties Had Higher Income And Job Growth From 2007-2011 Than Counties In The State Which Had No Fracking. "Between 2007 and 2011, per-capita income rose by 19 percent in Pennsylvania counties with more than 200 wells, by 14 percent in counties with between 20 and 200 wells, and by 12 percent in counties with fewer than 20 wells. In counties without any hydrofracking wells, income went up by only 8 percent. It is important to note, too, that counties with the lowest per-capita incomes experienced the most rapid growth. Moreover, counties with more than 200 wells added jobs at a 7 percent annual rate over the same time period. Where there was no drilling, or only a few wells, the number of county jobs shrank by 3 percent." (Diana Furchtgott-Roth and Andrew Gray, "The Economic Effects Of Hydrofracturing On Local Economies: A Comparison Of New York And Pennsylvania," The Manhattan Institute, 5/13)

A 2014 Study From The Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council Concluded That Pennsylvania's Fracking Boom Primarily Benefited Small And Medium Sized Businesses. "At the same time, while the number of businesses (in this case, establishments) declined in the nation and in Pennsylvania, the number of establishments grew strongly among Pennsylvania's energy sector. And it is critical to note the role and growth of smaller businesses. Table 46 makes clear that expanded production in the energy sector has been a boon for small and midsize enterprises in the state. Or, to look at it from a different angle, expanded energy production has been driven by small and midsize businesses." (Raymond J. Keating, "Benefits Of Natural Gas Production And Exports For U.S. Small Businesses: Nationally And Key States," Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council, 11/14)

A 2011 Report Published By The Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia Found That Pennsylvania Landowners Will Receive $200 Billion In Royalty Payments Over The Lifetime Of The Marcellus Shale. "The landowners' estimated share of royalty value per well, which typically drains 80 acres, is around $2.5 million and will be paid out over the lifetime of the well. This could lead to Pennsylvania landowners receiving an estimated $200 billion over the life of the Marcellus Shale development." (Timothy W. Kelsey, Ph.D. and Thomas B. Murphy, "Economic Implications Of Natural Gas Drilling In The Marcellus Shale Region," The Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia's Cascade, Summer 2011)

  • The Report Found That The Estimated Value Of Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Reserves In Pennsylvania Is $1.46 Trillion. "Current estimates indicate that about 489 trillion cubic feet of gas can be recovered from the Marcellus shale formation in Pennsylvania, for a total gross value of $1.46 trillion." (Timothy W. Kelsey, Ph.D. and Thomas B. Murphy, "Economic Implications Of Natural Gas Drilling In The Marcellus Shale Region," The Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia's Cascade, Summer 2011)

An IHS Study Found The Shale Gas Industry Paid $641 Million Dollars In Taxes To The State Of Pennsylvania In 2010, Providing Significant Revenues For The State's Transportation And Public Safety Budgets. "Pennsylvania's 2010 state budget included $11 billion for public transportation and $9 billion for public safety and criminal justice. A combination of corporations, businesses and individuals supporting unconventional natural gas activity paid a combined total of $641 million in taxes to Pennsylvania state and local governments that year, accounting for 6 percent of the state's transportation budget and 7 percent of spending on public safety and criminal justice." (Mohsen Bonakdarpour, John W. Larson, Tabitha M. Bailey, and Richard F. Fullenbaum, "The Economic And Employment Contributions Of Unconventional Gas Development IN State Economies," IHS, 6/12)

  • IHS Later Reported That In 2012 Fracking Contributed Nearly $1.3 Billion In Tax Revenues To Pennsylvania State And Local Governments. "This includes almost $1.3 billion in state and local taxes, or the equivalent of 3.9% of the state's 2011 tax revenues." ("America's New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy Volume 2: State Economic Contributions," IHS, 12/12)

MAJOR PENNSLYVANIA ENERGY GROUPS HAVE ENDORSED PRESIDENT TRUMP BECAUSE HE SUPPORTS AMERICAN ENERGY

In September, The Pennsylvania Grade Crude Coalition (PGCC) Endorsed President Trump For A Second Term. "The families of, workers of, and members of, The Pennsylvania Grade Crude Coalition (PGCC) are proud to endorse Donald J. Trump for President." (David Clark, President Of PGCC, Letter To America First PAC, 9/9/20)

In September, The Pennsylvania Independent Petroleum Producers (PIPP) Endorsed President Trump For A Second Term. "The Pennsylvania Independent Petroleum Producers are proud to endorse Donald J. Trump for President." (Mark L. Cline, Sr., President, Board Of Directors PIPP, Letter To America First PAC, 9/9/20)

Donald J. Trump, Campaign Press Release - Biden Would Kill Fracking In Pennsylvania? Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/345713

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