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Gerald R. Ford: Exchange With Reporters on Arrival at St. Louis, Missouri.
Gerald
Gerald R. Ford
7 - Exchange With Reporters on Arrival at St. Louis, Missouri.
January 5, 1976
Public Papers of the Presidents
Gerald R. Ford<br>1976-77: Book I
Gerald R. Ford
1976-77: Book I
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United States
Missouri
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GOOD MORNING, everybody. How are you this morning?

REPORTER. Good morning.

THE PRESIDENT. It is great to be here in St. Louis with Governor Kit Bond and Attorney General Jack Danforth, as well as others. I enjoy this nice weather you are having here. [laughter]

Q. Will you be doing much campaigning in New Hampshire?

THE PRESIDENT. We will be up there some, as I have said, but the main job, of course, will be working in the Oval Office on very important Presidential matters.

Q. Will you be spending any more than 1 day up there?

THE PRESIDENT. We have not finalized the exact amount, but we will be there some, and I think enough.

Q. Mr. President, a lot of the delegates to the convention are concerned about the way foreign policy and farm policy are tied together right now.

THE PRESIDENT. Well, I think if you listen to my speech this morning before the American Farm Bureau Federation, you will find that we don't think that a cutoff of grain to the Soviet Union would be successful and wouldn't be advisable in the Angolan situation. And we believe that there are better ways to approach the matter.

Q. What are you going to do about the Algolan situation? Are you going to call for a cease-fire there?

THE PRESIDENT. I have said that a cease fire is by far the best way to permit the Angolans to settle the Angolan problem. It seems to me that if all foreign intervention was eliminated that the Angolans will, among themselves, resolve the difficulties and go on from being freed from Portuguese control.

Q. What other leverage do we have in Angola, Mr. President?

THE PRESIDENT. Well, I think we have the prestige of the United States in working bilaterally, as well as with the Organization of African Unity. I think, in the final analysis, most African nations would prefer to have the Angolan problem solved by the Angolans themselves. And we are working on a very broad basis, as well as on a bilateral basis in order to try to achieve that result.
Thank you very, very much.


Note: The exchange began at 10:15 a.m. at Lambert Field.
Citation: Gerald R. Ford: "Exchange With Reporters on Arrival at St. Louis, Missouri.," January 5, 1976. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=6243.
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