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Gerald R. Ford: Remarks in Belgrade Following a Meeting With President Josip Broz Tito of Yugoslavia.
Gerald
Gerald R. Ford
468 - Remarks in Belgrade Following a Meeting With President Josip Broz Tito of Yugoslavia.
August 4, 1975
Public Papers of the Presidents
Gerald R. Ford<br>1975: Book II
Gerald R. Ford
1975: Book II
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Mr. President:

The talks that we have had for the last day have been too short, but we have discussed in great detail some of the very major matters that both of our countries are equally interested in.

We did discuss the bilateral relations between Yugoslavia and the United States. That included, of course, our economic relationships. It did, of course, include our military relationships. And in both instances, I indicated very firmly that I would give both matters or problems my very personal attention because of their significance.

We did discuss the results of the CSCE Conference in Helsinki. It was agreed that this was a step forward, as both of us indicated in our speeches in Helsinki, but that we had to produce progress if we were to justify the action. And when we meet here in Belgrade 2 years from now, the success of Helsinki would be proven by the actions that have been taken in the interim.

We did, of course, discuss the problems of the Middle East. I indicated that the United States would continue its very vital interest in progress in the Middle East. I stated very emphatically that a stalemate in the Middle East was unacceptable. I indicated that moderation on the part of all parties was essential.

I also indicated that flexibility was necessary if we were to achieve the kind of results that would avoid a potential, serious development, a catastrophe from the point of view of the world as a whole. Moderation, greater flexibility are absolutely essential at the present time.

I, of course, thank the President for his cordial and friendly welcome, and I express to the Yugoslavian people my gratitude for the warm reception given to Mrs. Ford and myself and our son, and I look forward to an expanding and improving relationship between our peoples.
Thank you very much.


Note: The President spoke at 11:43 a.m. at the Federal Executive Council Building.

President Tito responded in Serbo-Croatian. His remarks were translated by an interpreter as follows:

It is a little difficult for me to make a statement, as the President of the United States has already said all that I wanted to say.

I must say that the talks have been going in a very cordial and constructive spirit.

When we discussed bilateral relations, we found that such relations are already very good, but we agreed that they could be better and that we intended to expand them in the future.

Both sides have obviously expressed concern about the situation in the Middle East; I think [in] that our views are quite identical, especially after I heard what President Ford said about the actions the United States intends to take in the future.

As far as the international situation is concerned, we didn't discuss it in detail, but we discussed more the economic situation. We found together that the economic situation is very serious and that it will be a matter of serious discussion at the forthcoming Special Session of the United Nations. And after I heard what President Ford and State Secretary Kissinger said about the attitude the United States are going to take, I think I can be hopeful that the Special Session will be a successful one.

I think the talks with President Ford and State Secretary Kissinger were m the spirit of the joint declaration we adopted in Washington.

I wish to say that the visit has been a very successful one; it has enabled us to get to know each other a little better. I think President Ford has been able to see that the peoples of Yugoslavia--judging by the reception they gave you, sir--wish good relations with the United States of America.

So, I thank you for your visit which will be, I am sure, beneficial for both countries and for the future relations.
Thank you, Mr. President.

Earlier in the day, the President met with Prime Minister Dzemal Bijedic at the Old Palace.


Citation: Gerald R. Ford: "Remarks in Belgrade Following a Meeting With President Josip Broz Tito of Yugoslavia.," August 4, 1975. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=5147.
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