Home Search The American Presidency Project
John Woolley and Gerhard Peters Home Data Documents Elections Media Links
 
• Public Papers of the Presidents
• State of the Union
Addresses & Messages
• Inaugural Addresses
• Weekly Addresses
• Fireside Chats
• News Conferences
• Executive Orders
• Proclamations
• Signing Statements
• Press Briefings
• Statements of
 Administration Policy
• Economic Report of the President
• Debates
• Convention Speeches
• Party Platforms
• 2016 Election Documents
• 2012 Election Documents
• 2008 Election Documents
• 2004 Election Documents
• 1960 Election Documents
• 2009 Transition
• 2001 Transition
Data Index
Audio/Video Index
Election Index
Florida 2000
Presidential Libraries
View Public Papers by Month and Year

INCLUDE documents from the Office of the Press Secretary
INCLUDE election campaign documents
Search the Entire Document Archive
Enter keyword: 


AND OR NOT
Limit by Year

From:
To    :

Limit results per page

INCLUDE documents from the Office of the Press Secretary

INCLUDE election campaign documents

Instructions
You can search the Public Papers in two ways:

1. Search by Keyword and Year
You can search by keyword and choose the range of years within your search by filling out the boxes under Search the Public Papers.

2. View by Month and/or Year
Select the month and/or year you would like information about and press View Public Papers. Then choose a Public Paper and the page will load for you.

Search Engine provided by the Harry S. Truman Library. Our thanks to
Jim Borwick and Dr. Rafee Che Kassim at Project Whistlestop for critical assistance in the implementation of the search function, and to Scott Roley at the Truman Library for facilitating this collaboration.
 

The Public Papers of the Presidents contain most of the President's public messages, statements, speeches, and news conference remarks. Documents such as Proclamations, Executive Orders, and similar documents that are published in the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations, as required by law, are usually not included for the presidencies of Herbert Hoover through Gerald Ford (1929-1977), but are included beginning with the administration of Jimmy Carter (1977). The documents within the Public Papers are arranged in chronological order. The President delivered the remarks or addresses from Washington, D. C., unless otherwise indicated. The White House in Washington issued statements, messages, and letters unless noted otherwise. (Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, various dates.


Our archives include:
The Messages and Papers of the Presidents1789-1913
Herbert Hoover1929-1933
Franklin D. Roosevelt1933-1945
Harry S. Truman1945-1953
Dwight D. Eisenhower1953-1961
John F. Kennedy1961-1963
Lyndon B. Johnson1963-1969
Richard Nixon1969-1974
Gerald R. Ford1974-1977
Jimmy Carter1977-1981
Ronald Reagan1981-1989
George Bush1989-1993
William J. Clinton1993-2001
George W. Bush2001-2009
Barack Obama2009-present
Randomly Generated Public Paper from Today's Date in History
Barack Obama: 2009-present
Press Briefing by Principal Deputy Press Secretary Josh Earnest
July 29th, 2013

James S. Brady Press Briefing Room

1:00 P.M. EDT

MR. EARNEST: Good afternoon, everybody. I apologize for the delay in getting started. Mr. Carney --

Q: We're accustomed --

MR. EARNEST: I'm sorry?

Q: We're accustomed to it.

MR. EARNEST: Okay, good. I want to keep you in the rhythm here.

Mr. Carney is taking his son to camp today, so I'll be minding the store. So, Julie, I'll ring you up first.

Q: Thank you. A couple questions on the Mideast peace talks that are starting in Washington tonight. We know that the President apparently is going to be meeting with Secretary Kerry later today to discuss those talks, but does he have any plans to meet with the Israeli and Palestinian negotiators while they're in town?

MR. EARNEST: Julie, I don't have any details about the President's schedule over the next couple of days to read out to you. There's no current plan for that, but I wouldn't preclude anything from getting added in the future.

As you know, the Middle East peace process is something that -- or at least these conversations that are ongoing, or that are slated for this evening, was part of a process that was kicked off by the President's trip to the Middle East earlier this year. Many of you traveled there for that visit. And the President had the opportunity to visit with Prime Minister Netanyahu, President Abbas, and King Hussein of Jordan, where they had some conversations about how it's in the best interest of both the Israeli and Palestinian people to engage in final status negotiations.

Since that time, Secretary Kerry has been traveling frequently to the region. I think every couple of weeks it seems like he's taking a trip out there to talk to the parties and to talk to others in the region who have an important stake in this conflict being resolved.

So we're certainly encouraged that the two parties are coming to Washington and beginning their conversations this evening, but we're also cognizant of the hard work that remains over the next nine months. There are some very serious issues that have to be resolved, and it's not going to be easy. The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step, and we'll take that first step tonight.

Q: Now that this first round of talks is underway, how does the President see his direct role? Is this something where he's going to still continue to sort of seed the frontrunner status for the U.S. to Secretary Kerry and maybe only get involved if these talks continue and get to a real final status moment?

MR. EARNEST: Well, I'll say a couple things about that. The first is this is a process that got kick-started with the President's trip to the Middle East earlier this year. And at the President's direction, Secretary Kerry has been traveling frequently to the region to engage with leaders of both sides and the leaders of countries in the region to talk about this process. So there has been robust involvement from the United States. There is a role for the United States to play in terms of encouraging both sides to come to the table, trying to facilitate conversations, and in some cases even cajoling one side or the other to try to move the process forward.

That's something that Secretary Kerry has been engaged in for quite some time now and has taken up a lot of his time over the last several months. Ambassador Indyk is also going to play a role in this process now moving forward, as was announced earlier today, and the President will continue to be b ...
[Display the complete paper]

Home         
© 1999-2016 - Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley - The American Presidency Project
Locations of visitors to this page