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The Public Papers of the Presidents contain most of the President's public messages, statements, speeches, and news conference remarks. Documents such as Proclamations, Executive Orders, and similar documents that are published in the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations, as required by law, are usually not included for the presidencies of Herbert Hoover through Gerald Ford (1929-1977), but are included beginning with the administration of Jimmy Carter (1977). The documents within the Public Papers are arranged in chronological order. The President delivered the remarks or addresses from Washington, D. C., unless otherwise indicated. The White House in Washington issued statements, messages, and letters unless noted otherwise. (Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, various dates.


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Ronald Reagan: 1981-89
Executive Order 12606 - The Family
September 2nd, 1987

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, and in order to ensure that the autonomy and rights of the family are considered in the formulation and implementation of policies by Executive departments and agencies, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Family Policy-making Criteria. In formulating and implementing policies and regulations that may have significant impact on family formation, maintenance, and general well-being, Executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent permitted by law, assess such measures in light of the following questions:

(a) Does this action by government strengthen or erode the stability of the family and, particularly, the marital commitment?

(b) Does this action strengthen or erode the authority and rights of parents in the education, nurture, and supervision of their children?

(c) Does this action help the family perform its functions, or does it substitute governmental activity for the function?

(d) Does this action by government increase or decrease family earnings? Do the proposed benefits of this action justify the impact on the family budget?

(e) Can this activity be carried out by a lower level of government or by the family itself?

(f) What message, intended or otherwise, does this program send to the public concerning the status of the family?

(g) What message does it send to young people concerning the relationship between their behavior, their personal responsibility, and the norms of our society?

Sec. 2. Government-wide Family Policy Coordination and Review.

(a) Executive departments and agencies shall identify proposed regulatory and statutory provisions that may have significant potential negative impact on the family well-being and provide adequate rationale on why such proposal should be submitted. The head of the department or agency, shall certify in writing that, to the extent permitted by law, such measure has been assessed in light of the criteria in Section 1 of this Order and how such measures will enhance family well-being. Such certification shall be transmitted to the Office of Management and Budget. Departments and agencies shall give careful consideration to family-related concerns and their impact in notices of proposed rulemaking and messages transmitting legislative proposals to the Congress.

(b) The Office of Management and Budget shall, to the extent permitted by law, take action to ensure that the policies of the Executive departments and agencies are applied in light of the criteria set forth in Section 1 of this Order.

(c) The Office of Policy Development shall assess existing and proposed policies and regulations that impact family wellbeing in light of the criteria established by Section i of this Order, provide evaluations on those measures that have significant potential impact on the family to the Office of Management and Budget, and advise the President on policy and regulatory actions that may be taken to strengthen the institutions of marriage and family in America.

Sec. 3. Report. The Office of Policy Development shall submit preliminary reports including specific recommendations to the Domestic Policy Council and shall submit a final report to the President no later than 180 days from the date of this Order. Each year thereafter, a report, including recommendations shall be submitted, through the Domestic Policy Council to the President.

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