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Lyndon B. Johnson: Joint Statement Following Discussions With Vice President Yen of the Republic of China.
Lyndon
Lyndon B. Johnson
219 - Joint Statement Following Discussions With Vice President Yen of the Republic of China.
May 10, 1967
Public Papers of the Presidents
Lyndon B. Johnson<br>1967: Book I
Lyndon B. Johnson
1967: Book I
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HIS EXCELLENCY Yen Chia-kan, Vice President and Prime Minister of the Republic of China, has concluded a two-day visit to Washington at the invitation of President Johnson. Vice President Yen met with President Johnson to discuss matters of common concern on May 9. Also present were Ambassador Chow Shu-kai, Minister of Economic Affairs Li Kwoh-ting, Ambassador to the United Nations Liu Chieh, Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Samson C. Shen, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Ambassador to China Walter P. McConaughy, and Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs William P. Bundy. Director of the Information Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Lai Chia-chiu was present as recorder for the Chinese side.

The President welcomed the opportunity to reaffirm to the Vice President the solemn commitment of the United States as provided for in the Mutual Defense Treaty of 1954. Vice President Yen noted that the Chinese Communists pose a continuing threat, and the President reassured the Vice President that the United States intends to continue to furnish military aid to the Republic of China in accordance with the provisions of the Military Assistance Agreement of 1951.

The President and Vice President reviewed the international situation, with particular reference to the current situation in East Asia. They exchanged information and views on conditions on the Chinese mainland resulting from the Cultural Revolution. They agreed that the struggle for power is far from over and that developments on the Chinese mainland are closely related to the peace and security of Asia. They further agreed to consult on future developments on the Chinese mainland.

The President and the Vice President reviewed the Free World effort to halt Communist aggression against the Republic of Vietnam. President Johnson and Vice President Yen agreed that unless the aggression is stopped, peace and security cannot prevail in Asia and the Pacific region. The President expressed his gratification with the Republic of China's contributions to the development of Vietnam's economy, noting especially the work of Chinese technicians in assisting the Republic of Vietnam to increase her food production. The Vice President expressed the strong support of the Republic of China for the United States policy in Vietnam and the hope that the Republic of China would find it possible further to strengthen her economic and technical cooperation with the Republic of Vietnam.

It was agreed that periodic consultations between the United States and the Republic of China on problems of common concern in East Asia had been fruitful and should be continued.

The President and the Vice President discussed the question of Chinese representation in the United Nations. They noted the favorable outcome of the 21st General Assembly when efforts to expel the Republic of China from the United Nations and seat the Chinese Communists were decisively defeated. The President reaffirmed that the United States firmly supports the Republic of China's seat in the United Nations. The President and the Vice President agreed that their Governments would continue to consult closely on the best means for achieving their common objectives in the United Nations.

The President expressed admiration for the continuing progress made by the Republic of China in developing Taiwan's economy since the conclusion of the U.S. economic aid program in 1965. He also noted the sharp contrast between economic conditions in Taiwan and on the Chinese mainland.

The President congratulated Vice President Yen on the remarkable success of the Republic of China's technical cooperation programs in friendly countries, particularly in the field of agriculture, and noted that the Republic of China is making a most significant contribution to the collective War on Hunger.

In the course of their conversation President Johnson and Vice President Yen also reviewed programs intended to develop cooperation among Asian nations. The President and Vice President noted the potentialities of the Asian and Pacific Council and the Asian Development Bank to promote peace and prosperity in Asia and the Pacific region.

Vice President Yen spoke of the need to strengthen science and technology in the Republic of China as a vital force in national and regional development. He welcomed the President's offer to have his Science Adviser, Dr. Hornig, lead a team of experts to Taiwan to survey scientific and technological assets and needs in the Republic of China. Dr. Hornig will also advise on ways by which more career opportunities might be provided in Taiwan for Chinese scientists now teaching and working outside China.

President Johnson and Vice President Yen reaffirmed the strong ties between the United States and the Republic of China founded on the historic friendship between the Chinese and American peoples.


Note: On September 14, 1967, Dr. Donald F. Hornig, Director of the Office of Science and Technology, left for Taiwan as head of a six-man team of experts who were to survey the scientific and technological assets and needs of the Republic of China. For a statement by the President upon the mission's return, see Item 416.
Citation: Lyndon B. Johnson: "Joint Statement Following Discussions With Vice President Yen of the Republic of China.," May 10, 1967. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=28249.
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