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  House and Senate Concurrence with Presidents: Eisenhower - Obama

"Vote concurrence is measured by the number of times a majority of members of Congress vote with the president's position on roll call votes. Member concurrence is the percentage of members who agree with the president's position on a roll call vote. Unlike the usual scholarly focus on success or support, the concurrence measures acknowledge that it is impossible to judge who influenced whom." -- Ragsdale, Vital Statistics on the Presidency

President
Year Congress Total
Concurrence
(H&S)
House of Representatives Senate
Majority rate % # votes Majority rate % # votes
Dwight D. Eisenhower

1953

83rd 89.2 REP 91.2 34 REP 87.8 49
1954 82.8 78.9 38 77.9 77
1955 84th 75.3 DEM 63.4 41 DEM 84.6 52
1956 69.2 73.5 34 67.7 65
1957 85th 68.4 DEM 58.3 60 DEM 78.9 57
  1958 75.7 74.0 50 76.5 98
  1959 86th 52.9 DEM 55.6 54 DEM 50.4 121
  1960 65.1 65.1 43 65.1 86
Average      72.3%   70.0%     73.6%  
John F. Kennedy 1961 87th 81.4 DEM 83.1

65

DEM 80.6 124
  1962 85.4 85.0 60 85.6 125
1963 88th 87.1 DEM 83.1 71 DEM 89.6 115
Average      84.6%   83.7%     85.3%  
Lyndon B. Johnson

1964

88th 87.9 DEM 88.5 52 DEM 87.6 97
  1965 89th 93.1 DEM 93.8 112 DEM 92.6 162
  1966 78.9 91.3 103 68.8 125
1967 90th 78.8 DEM 75.6 127 DEM 81.2 165
1968 74.5 83.5 103 68.9 164
Average      82.6%   86.5%     78.8%  
Richard Nixon 1969 91st 73.9 DEM 72.3 47 DEM 76.4 72
  1970 76.9 84.6 65 71.4 91
  1971 92nd 74.8 DEM 82.5 57 DEM 69.5 82
  1972 66.3 81.1 37 54.3 46
1973 93rd 50.6 DEM 48.0 125 DEM 52.4 185
1974 59.6 67.9 53 54.2 83
Average      67.0%   72.7%     63.0%  
Gerald R. Ford

1974

93rd

58.2

DEM 59.3 54 DEM 57.4 68
  1975 94th 61.0 DEM 50.6 89 DEM 71.0 93
1976 53.8 43.1 51 64.2 53
Average      57.7%   51.0%     64.2%  
Jimmy Carter 1977 95th 75.4 DEM 74.7 79 DEM 76.1 88
  1978 78.3 69.6 112 84.8 151
  1979 96th 76.8 DEM 71.7 145 DEM 81.4 161
1980 75.1 76.9 117 73.3 116
Average      76.4%   73.2%     78.9%  
Ronald Reagan

1981

97th 82.4 DEM 72.4 76 REP 88.3 128
1982 72.4 55.8 77 83.2 119
  1983 98th 67.1 DEM 47.6 82 REP 85.9 85
  1984 65.8 52.2 113 85.7 77
  1985 99th 59.9 DEM 45.0 80 REP 71.6 102
  1986 56.1 34.1 88 81.2 80
1987 100th 43.5 DEM 33.3 99 DEM 56.4 78
1988 47.4 32.7 104 64.8 88
Average      61.8%   46.6%     77.1%  
George Bush 1989 101st 62.6 DEM 50.0 86 DEM 73.3 101
  1990 46.8 32.4 108 63.4 93
  1991 102nd 54.2 DEM 43.0 111 DEM 69.0 81
1992 43.0 37.0 105 53.0 60
Average      51.7%   40.6%     64.7%  
William J. Clinton

1993

103rd 86.4 DEM 87.2 102 DEM 85.4 89
1994 86.4 87.2 78 85.5 62
  1995 104th 36.2 REP 26.3 133 REP 49.0 102
  1996 55.1 53.2 79 57.6 59
  1997 105th 53.6 REP 38.7 75 REP 71.4 63
  1998 50.6 36.6 82 67.0 72
1999 106th 37.8 REP 35.4 82 REP 42.2 45
2000 55.0 49.3 69 65.0 40
Average      57.6%   51.7%     65.4%  
George W. Bush 2001 107th 86.7 REP 83.7 43 DEM* 88.3 77
  2002 87.8 82.5 40 91.4 58
  2003 108th 78.7 REP 87.3 48 REP 74.8 89
  2004 72.6

70.6

24 74.0 37
  2005 109th 78.0 REP 78.3 46 REP 77.8 45
2006 80.9 85.0 40 78.6 70
2007 110th 38.3 DEM 15.4 117 DEM 66.0 97
2008 26.3 33.8 80 68.5 54
Average      68.7%   67.1%     77.4%  
Barack Obama

2009

111th 96.7 DEM 94.4 72 DEM 98.8 79
  2010 85.8 88.1 42 84.4 64
2011 112th 57.1 REP 31.6 95 DEM 84.3 89
2012 53.6 19.7 61 79.7 79
  2013 113th 56.7 REP 20.9 86 DEM 85.2 108
Average      70.0%   50.9%     86.5%  

Citation: "House and Senate Concurrence with Presidents." The American Presidency Project. Ed. John T. Woolley and Gerhard Peters. Santa Barbara, CA: University of California. 1999-2016.
Available from the World Wide Web: http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/data/concurrence.php.

Notes:
* On June 6, 2001, Senator Jim Jeffords (NH) left the Republican Party and became an independent. He chose to caucus with the Democrat
s and therefore made the Democratic Party the majority party in the Senate. Senator Tom Daschle (D-SD) became the majority leader.

Data Sources:
• Lyn Ragsdale, "Vital Statistics on the Presidency." CQ Press (various editions)
• Harold Stanley and Richard Niemi, "Vital Statistics on American Politics." CQ Press (various editions)
• "Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report" (various editions)

 

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